NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center | Credit: NASA

NASA Climate Satellite Blasts off to Survey Oceans and Atmosphere of a Warming Earth

2/26/2024 - By Jonathan Watts. CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA’s newest climate satellite rocketed into orbit Thursday to survey the world’s oceans and atmosphere in never-before-seen detail. SpaceX launched the Pace satellite on its $948 million mission before dawn, with the Falcon rocket heading south over the Atlantic to achieve a… SEE MORE
Honeywell’s high-altitude LiDAR atmospheric sensing (HALAS) system measures atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction. Credit: Honeywell

NOAA and Honeywell to explore use of HALAS upper-air data to aid in weather forecasting

2/22/2024 - By weather.gov. February 7, 2024 - NOAA’s National Weather Service and Honeywell Aerospace Technologies signed a two-year Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to deploy a high-altitude LiDAR Atmospheric Sensing (HALAS) ground system and to evaluate the upper-air data gathered to determine if it could aid in weather forecasting. Honeywell’s HALAS ground system uses… SEE MORE
This composite image shows the progression of a total solar eclipse over Madras, Oregon, on Aug. 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

The 2024 Total Eclipse & NASA

2/6/2024 - By science.nasa.gov. On April 8, 2024, a total solar eclipse will cross the continental United States, providing an exciting and breathtaking opportunity for observation and science. A total solar eclipse happens when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, completely blocking the face of the Sun. People located in… SEE MORE
Scientists study shipwreck sites to better understand ecological processes like succession, zonation, connectivity, energy flow, disturbance, and degradation. In the future, shipwrecks may provide opportunities to establish a global monitoring network for studying these processes in aquatic environments. Illustration by Alex Boersma.

Scientists Study Shipwrecks to Understand Underwater Ecology

1/28/2024 - By coastalscience.noaa.gov. In a newly published paper in BioScience, NCCOS scientists collaborated with an international team of ecologists and archaeologists to describe how shipwrecks provide a unique opportunity to study complex ecological processes. The synthesis focuses on a range of fundamental ecological functions and processes and how they manifest on and around shipwrecks.… SEE MORE
gettyimages.com

Unsettled Pacific Ocean Offers Few Clear Indicators for Salmon Success in 2024

1/26/2024 - By fisheries.noaa.gov Want to learn how the Pacific Ocean is likely to change and affect salmon survival in the coming year? Stay tuned, scientists say. The ocean indicators that NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center researchers track off Newport, on the Central Oregon Coast, are decidedly mixed for the coming year. El Niño… SEE MORE
Workshop participants collect water samples to explore phytoplankton at Bodega Bay Marine Laboratory.

California Tribal Communities Ready to Monitor Culturally Important Marine Resources Impacted by Harmful Algal Blooms

1/24/2024 - By coastalscience.noaa.gov Traditional shellfish resources are often the lifeway to coastal tribes who rely on indigenous fisheries for subsistence. However, the expanding threat of harmful algal blooms (HABs) contaminate shellfish and poison local communities. NCCOS engages both locally and through regional partnerships with tribal nations to design workshops specific to… SEE MORE
en.wikipedia.org

How the Great Lakes Formed—And the Mystery of Who Watched It Happen

1/18/2024 - By  Gemma Tarlach Now, thanks to innovative technology, determination, and luck, archaeologists are bringing this lost human history to the surface, and piecing together the mystery of a hunter-gatherer society unlike any other in the region. The North American Great Lakes, sometimes called inland seas, are the world’s largest freshwater system. They… SEE MORE